Copy of Dirty linen: the world told how Nigerian Military, Police raped underaged Boko Haram victims. Despite recession, Arik plans to double aircrafts. Politics not Igbos’ calling – Bruce. Saudi Arabia’s influence on Nigeria examined. 7 Down: economy forces 7Up & CocaCola to reduce bottles. Stay home for life! Ogun sacks union leaders. Oyegun’s office in total darkness over N1.7m electricity debt. Sorrowful day for FGGC Oyo, 5 dead, 4 wounded in accident. Global movement rises against Cross River ‘superhighway’. Desist from MMM, it’s fraud – CBN’s official answer to pupil’s question. Plus hundreds of other headlines.

Hello Nigeria, this is Breaking Radio.

From the headlines and news of major local and international news sources, Breaking presents the Breaking Radio from Lagos; Nigeria’s mega city. I have got news from Thisday, Daily Post, Daily Independent, The Punch, Nigerian Guardian, Vanguard, Nigerian Pilot, Premium Times, Sun Newspaper, PM News, Leadership newspaper, The Herald, The Nation, Royal Times, Sahara Reporters, News Agency of Nigeria and more. You can head over to breaking.com.ng on your mobile phone for direct links to news on one page.

  • Dirty linen: the world is told how Nigerian Military, Police raped underaged Boko Haram victims
  • Despite recession, plans to double aircrafts.
  • Politics not Igbos’ calling – Bruce
  • Saudi Arabia’s influence on Nigeria examined
  • 7 Down: economy forces 7Up & CocaCola to reduce bottles
  • Stay home for life! Ogun sacks union leaders.
  • Oyegun’s office in total darkness over 1.7m electricity debt
  • Sorrowful day at Federal Govt Girls College (FGGC), 5 dead, 4 wounded in accident
  • Global movement rises against Cross River ‘superhighway’
  • Desist from MMM, it’s fraud – CBN’s official answer to pupil’s question
  • And hundreds of other headlines

Nigerian airline to double fleet with Middle East routes on the radar

Nigeria’s largest airline Arik Air plans to nearly double its fleet to 52 planes within 10 years and has already ordered some of them from Boeing, a source at the company said.
Most of the carrier’s existing fleet are Boeing planes and the source, who did not wish to be identified, said the airline would buy most of the new planes from the US jet maker. The source did not say how many had already been ordered or the value of the purchases.
Privately owned Arik Air needs more planes as it aims to add international routes and increase services, including daily flights to New York, to offset a slowdown at home and bring in more hard currency.
It is also seeking new investors to help it grow and has said it wants to raise up to $1b through a private share placement next year and a possible initial public offering (IPO).
Founded a decade ago and now west Africa’s biggest carrier by passenger numbers, Arik Air has appointed advisers for the share placement and potential IPO in Lagos, with a secondary listing in London.
“We hope to maintain our market leadership and our growth strategy involving substantially increasing our fleet to 52 aircrafts by 2025,” said the managing director Chris Ndulue in Lagos marking the carrier’s 10 years of operations.
“We plan to put our footprint in Europe, Asia and Latin America and the Middle East, and this requires additional aircraft,” he said.
Arik Air’s home market has been hit by falling demand as a currency crisis in Africa’s top economy deepens, due in part to the oil price slump. United and Iberia both stopped services to Nigeria this year and Emirates and Kenya Airways have announced plans to suspend flights to Nigeria’s capital Abuja by next month.
Mr Ndulue said Arik Air would also look at various funding options from international banks despite dollar shortages and the economic recession at home, which had affected businesses.
The carrier currently has a fleet of 28 aircraft, mostly Boeings but also three Airbus planes and nine Bombardier aircraft.
New routes and services would help the airline to generate foreign currency.
Last week Arik announced plans to start daily flights to New York in the next six months, up from three times a week, and start flights to Rome and Paris within 18 to 24 months. The carrier flies mainly within western and central Africa, as well as to London and Johannesburg.
A plunge in Nigeria’s naira currency has increased the cost of importing jet fuel and hurt profit margins as many passengers pay fares in naira.

“Nigeria Can’t Stand Without The South East” – Ben Bruce Says “Igbos Are The Most Successful Nigerians”

Ben Murray Bruce, the senator representing Bayelsa East and the chairman of Silverbird Group, had over the weekend cited the civil war, otherwise known as the Biafran War, as the reason why Nigeria has not grown technologically.
Senator Murray Bruce who was in Aba, stated this on Saturday, August 27, 2016, while addressing the International Youth Day Conference which was organised by the Vision Alive Empowerment under the recognition of the United Nations, UN.
While speaking on the theme, “How To Make A Good Choice While At The Youthful Age,” the senator revealed more about his youthful age stating that the right choice he made during his youth led him to become a successful businessman. He explained why Nigeria is not growing in the tech world, and why technology is not contributing to the Nigeria’s economy.
“Nigeria is moving backward because they think that they are smart, and they do everything possible to erase the Nigeria/Biafra civil war in the history by burning and destroying all the tech tools which Biafrans used during the civil war,” Bruce was quoted as saying. “Igbos are the most successful people in Nigeria today, both tech and business, even before and after the civil war, Igbos has been advanced more than other tribes, that’s why the other tribe in Nigeria can’t do without them.”
Furthermore, the senator said, had Nigeria keep those tech tools and maintain the history of the civil war, with the massive tech tools owned by the Biafrans, Nigeria would have excelled worldwide and make a good fortune out of it. “Look at United State of America today, most of their technology experts are not Americans and most of their tools they use are Chinese owned tools, because during those days Chinese were like slave to them and they see the potentials inside the Chinese and utilized it.
“Likewise, when Nigeria thinks that they have defeated Biafrans during the civil war, that was when General Yakubu Gowon declared ‘no victor no vanquish.’ Had Nigeria kept those Biafran tech tools they used during the civil war and utilized them, you can imagine where Nigeria would have been today in the technology world.
“Nigeria thinks they played a smart deal by burning it and destroying it because they are afraid of Biafra and it has always been their worst nightmare, but they made a big mistake and it has drawn us backward rather than forward in the technology world today. “Nigeria can’t stand without the South East.
Also the Igbos, South East precisely should focus on their God gifted gift and maybe politics isn’t their calling, they have been technologically and Business endowed.
“Igbos are blessed, South East are blessed, only if they can look beyond Nigeria politics and focus on the God gifted talent, they will excel, and be great again.
“Seceding or agitation isn’t the solution only if they can realize their great potentials and focused on it, develop and build South East, look beyond Nigeria politics, since it seems like it’s not their calling,” he added.
Addressing the youths, the senator said, “make a good choice today so that your future will justify you. Stop thinking what a mortal man sitting on the Aso Rock can do for you and start thinking how you can be great to yourself. Furthermore, every human is gifted only if you can find and develop the potentials in you.” – From News Wire Nigeria

How far does Saudi Arabia’s influence go? Look at Nigeria.

In recent months, Iran’s foreign minister blamed “fanaticism from the Dark Ages,” exported by Saudi Arabia, for sparking extremist movements around the world. Defenders, meanwhile, have argued that blaming Saudi Arabia for global terrorism is a mistake. Both of these arguments are wrong, because they either attribute too much or too little influence to Saudi Arabia. So how far does Saudi Arabia’s religious influence extend beyond its borders? Let’s look at northern Nigeria, home to a huge but diverse Salafist movement and the extremist group Boko Haram.
There is no question that Saudi Arabia had significant influence over the development of Salafism in northern Nigeria. One of the key movers in early, proto-Salafist activism in northern Nigeria was Abubakar Gumi, a senior judge and skilled preacher who supervised the creation of the mass-based, Salafist-leaning Izala movement in 1978. Gumi had a lifelong relationship with Saudi Arabia, representing northern Nigeria at meetings of the Saudi-founded Muslim World League in the 1960s, serving on the consultative council of Saudi Arabia’s Islamic University of Medina in the 1970s and receiving the King Faisal Prize in 1987. Gumi and Izala received significant financial support from Saudi Arabia as well, which helped Izala to mount a serious campaign against Sufism, a form of organized Islamic mysticism that was, and remains, widespread in northern Nigeria.
Another, more recent Salafist leader in northern Nigeria was Jafar Mahmud Adam. He began his career as a young preacher in Izala, graduated from the Islamic University of Medina in 1993 and returned to Nigeria to pioneer a more independent and more globally attuned form of Salafism. In the process, he won a mass audience and helped propel a circle of other preachers, many of them also graduates of Adam’s alma mater, into influential positions as preachers and government officials. Adam regularly invoked his learning in Medina as part of the foundation for his religious authority. For much of his later career, he also received financial support from al-Muntada al-Islami Trust, a London-based charity with ties to Saudi Arabia.
Yet neither Gumi nor Adam was a Saudi puppet, and both men adapted their preaching to the context of northern Nigerian society and politics. Intellectually, Gumi remained deeply immersed in the world of North and West African Islamic scholarship, professing admiration for core thinkers in the Maliki school of religious law until the end of his life, even though Salafists largely reject adherence to any such school.
Although Adam was more in tune with global Salafist thought than Gumi was, he and his companions were also pragmatic actors who made compromises with their environment. Despite his reservations about the fairness and viability of democracy, Adam briefly served as an official in the government of Kano state, where he lived. Gumi went even further in his political activism, at one point urging Muslim women to vote by arguing that “politics is more important than prayer” — a position that would horrify many Saudi scholars. Adam was also open to compromises with Sufis, suggesting in one speech that Salafists and Kano’s two major Sufi orders should have equal shares of an annual, public Ramadan service.
If the Salafist movement in Nigeria has relatively strong ties to Saudi Arabia, it may be surprising that Boko Haram has extremely weak organizational ties to the kingdom. Whereas Gumi and Adam had lifelong, public contacts with the kingdom, Boko Haram has been led by figures who were trained almost entirely within Nigeria.
The group has some intellectual ties to the kingdom. Boko Haram’s founder, Muhammad Yusuf, visited Saudi Arabia for pilgrimages and spent a brief period of self-imposed exile there in 2004, but no evidence has shown that he enrolled in an institution or had contact with senior Saudi scholars and officials. Yusuf’s successor, Abubakar Shekau, had even less contact with Saudi Arabia — there is no evidence that Shekau has ever left Africa. Meanwhile, Adam – although he had mentored Yusuf during the early 2000s – publicly repudiated Boko Haram by the mid-2000s, drawing on his credentials from Medina to paint Yusuf as an ignorant opportunist.
There has been some suspicion that al-Muntada al-Islami Trust funneled money to Boko Haram in the early 2000s to help the group prepare for jihad, but the evidence for this is inconclusive. Even if it is true, this would indicate only an indirect tie between Boko Haram and Saudi Arabia itself. At the same time, though, Yusuf claimed religious authority partly on the basis of his interpretations of senior Saudi scholars’ views. It would be false to say that Saudi Arabia supported Boko Haram, but it would be equally false to say that Saudi Arabia had no influence on the movement’s worldview.
The careers of Gumi, Adam and Yusuf all involved multiple factors. It is unlikely that Gumi would have embraced anti-Sufism without his long experience in British colonial schools; he began to question the religious authorities around him by the late 1940s, well before he ever left Nigeria. It is unlikely that Adam could have become so prominent and independent without the broader transformations that occurred in Africa’s politics and media landscape in the 1990s, which allowed young Muslim preachers to build mass audiences by distributing their sermons through technologies such as cassettes and CDs. Yusuf, meanwhile, probably benefited from the early patronage of political elites in Borno, his home state. For all three men, local ties were just as important as transnational ones.
Saudi Arabia’s influence in Africa, then, should neither be exaggerated nor minimized. Support from Saudi Arabia has boosted the careers of certain religious leaders on the continent, increasing their opportunities, funding and stature. But such support has not determined the content of what those leaders say.
There are also profound limits to the influence of Saudi Arabia’s African partners. Despite decades of anti-Sufism from Gumi and others, Sufism continues to remain vibrant and influential for millions of Muslims in northern Nigeria and beyond. Sometimes, Saudi Arabia is neither arsonist nor firefighter, but simply one factor among many in shaping the religious lives of Muslims around the world.
From Washington Post and written by Alexander Thurston, an assistant professor of teaching for the African studies program at Georgetown University. His first book, published in September, is “Salafism in Nigeria: Islam, Preaching, and Politics.”

BusinessDay, reports softdrink companies cut quantity by 17% on back of inflation

Beverage companies in Nigeria have reduced the quantity of soft drinks in their bottles by 16.6 percent amid soaring inflation rate that has continued to raise production costs while impacting their margins negatively. Specifically, Coca Cola Nigeria Limited and 7up Bottling Company have reduced the sizes of their 60cl pet bottle.

From The Punch: CBN warns against patronage of ‘wonder banks’
The Central Bank of Nigeria on Monday warned Nigerians against patronising what it called ‘wonder banks’, stating that their activities were not regulated by it.

The Head, Consumer Protection Department, CBN, Hajiya Kadija Kassim, stated this during a mentoring programme for students of the Government Secondary School, Suleja, Niger State.
The mentoring programme, which was held simultaneously in over 200 schools, was part of activities to mark the World Savings Day.
The apex bank’s warning is coming at a time when the huge unemployment situation in the country is making a lot of people to take interest in an online investment scheme tagged: ‘MMM Federal Republic of Nigeria (nigeria.mmm.net)’.
The platform has embarked on an aggressive online media campaign to lure the investing public to participate in what it called “mutual aid financial network,” with a monthly investment return of 30 per cent.
Kassim, while responding to a question asked by one of the students, described the scheme as fraudulent since it was not supported by any business model.
She said, “We have heard about the activities of MMM, but I want to warn you against it because they are wonder banks that are not regulated.
“Desist from their activities because they are fraudulent.”

Eleven days after Ogun workers embarked on an indefinite strike, government responded today with the dismissal of the state chairman of the Nigeria Labour Congress, NLC, Akeem Ambali, and the state chairman of Nigeria Union of Teachers, NUT, Dare Ilekoya.

Olusola Adeyemi, the Head of Ogun Public Service, announced the sack in Abeokuta in a statement entitled: “Government position on the recommendation of panel of inquiry set up to investigate alleged misconduct of executive members of the NUT on the 2016 World Teachers Day Celebrations held on October 5.”
Also dismissed are 14 other members of the state chapter of the NUT.
In addition, 16 officials of the union were suspended for their roles in organising the celebration.
The NLC chairman, who was until his dismissal the Deputy Director , Community and Social Development, Sagamu Local Government, was alleged to have masterminded the “political campaign rally” during the celebration.
According to Mr. Adeyemi, the panel indicted Mr. Ambali for making “inflammable and scandalous remarks against the state government”, which could cause breach of peace in the state.
“The Ogun State government accepts the recommendation of dismissal of the affected officials which the panel found guilty of contravening the Public Service Rules 04401,04421(c&d) and 04406(a)”, Mr. Adeyemi said.
He therefore directed the relevant agencies of government to implement the government decision.
In a swift reaction, the NLC chairman described the action as “executive recklessness and abuse of all statutory laws” urging workers to remain resolute in the quest to have their legitimate rights from “an autocratic and deceitful” government.
Mr. Ambali in a statement on Monday night, said he had never been summoned by any panel, and that, “the attention of the leadership was just drawn to the purported dismissal through phone calls.
“We are calling on our ever committed workers to remain at home and not be intimidated by this action that is against all norms of democratic and fair hearing.
“I have never been summoned by any panel and this clearly shows how autocratic and deceitful the government of Ibikunle Amosun is.
“Our cause for this strike is legitimate, just and right. They have only shown their true colours and this new approach is unprecedented in the history of this country, as no state governor has done what they are doing to us in Ogun state.
“Their past draconian efforts have never yielded any fruits, so also will be this move to cage us in Ogun State.
“We only want to warn that they should not set this state on fire, even as we urge our members to remain calm and just stay at home. The struggle continues,” he said.
Workers in the state commenced an indefinite strike on October 20 to protest non- remittance of 12 months deductions from their salaries.

From The Premium Times, Nigeria Supreme Court Judges Accused of Corruption Step Down
The spokesperson of Nigeria’s Supreme Court, Ahuraka Isah, on Monday confirmed reports that two Supreme Court judges accused of corruption have stopped sitting.

The two judges, Iyang Okoro and Sylvester Nguta, were among seven judges arrested by operatives of the State Security Service, following allegations of corruption.
In a telephone chat with PREMIUM TIMES, Mr. Isah, who speaks for the Chief Justice of Nigeria, Mahmud Mohammed, said the Supreme Court judges suspended sittings since the raid on their homes and their subsequent arrest.
“None of the judges whose houses were raided and arrested by the SSS have been suspended by the NJC,” the spokesperson said. “But the two affected Supreme Court justices voluntarily recused themselves from all judicial functions since the raid occurred.”
Seven judges were on October 7 arrested by the SSS following allegations of corruption.
While the affected judges have denied any wrongdoing, claiming victimisation for previous stands they took against public officials, the SSS said their arrest followed credible information about the judges’ alleged involvement in bribery and corruption allegations.
The SSS also accused the National Judicial Council of not judiciously treating petitions against corrupt judges. The NJC denied the allegation by the SSS.
Various groups have given divergent opinions about the raids and arrest of the judges. While some have commended the arrests, others have accused the executive of interfering with the judiciary by the arrests.
However, the President of the Nigeria Bar Association, Abubakar Mahmoud, had advised that the accused judges be suspended pending when they are cleared or convicted.
The NJC rejected Mr. Mahmoud’s advice.

Truck crushes 4 Oyo FGGC students, driver

FOUR students of the Federal Government Girls’ College, Oyo, who were returning from a mid-term break died in an auto crash, yesterday evening, when a gari-laden articulated truck fell on a bus conveying them to school.
The incident, in which the bus driver also died, left five other girls with severe injuries.
An impeccable source, who is a senior staff in the school, told Vanguard that the accident occurred at Sabo Market and that the four students died on the spot.
Students and teachers broke down in tears when the names of the affected students were mentioned on the assembly ground, yesterday.
The names of those who died in the accident are Ibirogba Marian, JSS 3; Ladipo Mojisola, SS1; Giwa Tohibat and John Bukola, who were both in SS3.
Vanguard further gathered that some of the students were coming from Oyo, while others were on their way from Lagos.
At press time, it was gathered that the father of one of the deceased came to the school Monday night to collect the remains of his daughter. The others were said to have been taken to a nearby town, Aawe for burial yesterday.
The incident generated tension, when students and some sympathisers wanted to stage peaceful protest. It was shelved for security reasons.
Confirming the accident, the state Police Public Relations Officer, Superintendent Adekunle Ajisebutu, said: “A DAF truck, loaded with gari, fell on a Suzuki commercial mini bus conveying students of the Federal Government College, Oyo.
“As a result, four of the students and the driver died, while five others were injured and were taken to Peamark Hospital, Oyo. They are responding to treatment. Investigation has since commenced.”

The Punch Reports police brutality
Police loot community, torture farmer to death

A 42-year-old farmer, Segun Elegbede, has died in the custody of policemen from the Magbon Police Division, Ogun State.
PUNCH Metro learnt that Segun was tortured before being abducted by a team of policemen from the Anti-Robbery Squad of the state, who invaded Ajibawo village, in the Ado-Odo/Ota Local Government Area.
The policemen were alleged to have looted shops in the community after which they descended on the victim.
He was said to have been taken away to the division and prevented from seeing friends and family members.
Seven days after he was arrested, a member of his family was reportedly called on the telephone that he was dead and his corpse deposited in a morgue.

Total blackout at APC National Secretariat over 1.7 million Naira

The national secretariat of the All Progressives Congress, APC, has been thrown into darkness following its inability to offset the 1.7 million Naira debt owed Abuja Electricity Distribution Company, AEDC.
The AEDC has disconnected the party’s office from electricity.
It was also gathered that the onset of the current economic meltdown, party activities had almost come to halt due to poor funds, as the party had in recent times, relied on the sale of forms to contestants in the last Edo State governorship election and the forthcoming election in Ondo State.
Vanguard reports that the APC national secretariat may have generated over N100 million this year from the sale of Nomination and Expression of Interest forms for Edo and Ondo States governorship primaries.
The ugly development has forced some staff of the secretariat to contribute some money to power the electricity generator at the premises.

The next article is from Science Daily and is titled:
Nigeria’s superhighway threatens local communities, elephants, and gorillas

A proposed superhighway in Nigeria’s Cross River State will displace 180 indigenous communities and threaten one of the world’s great centers of biodiversity if completed, according to experts.
A proposed superhighway in Nigeria’s Cross River State will displace 180 indigenous communities and threaten one of the world’s great centers of biodiversity if completed, according to WCS (Wildlife Conservation Society).
In response, WCS is launching an international campaign to encourage decision makers in Nigeria to pursue alternative development options to either reroute the proposed highway away from the protected areas and community forests along the border area with Cameroon, or to rehabilitate existing highways. The campaign has generated 41,786 petitions since October 14.
The process of clearing a corridor for the project has already begun but has been temporarily halted as a result of protests from local communities, which helped to initiate an environmental impact assessment, but work on the highway could restart at any time.
The WCS campaign is teaming up with the Ekuri Initiative, an award-winning forest stewardship organization run by one of the many indigenous communities in the path of the proposed highway. The Ekuri Initiative has already delivered 253,000 signatures to the federal government asking for Nigerian President Buhari to protect their precious ancestral forests, and WCS is asking its followers to sign on with their support.
“The proposed highway poses an enormous threat to the cultures and the wildlife of the entire region,” said John Calvelli, WCS’s Executive Vice President for Public Affairs and Director for the 96 Elephants campaign and other public engagement efforts for conservation. “We’re happy to lend our support to the Ekuri Initiative in the effort to save the local communities of Cross River State and the irreplaceable natural treasures also found there.”
The new highway will stretch 162 miles in length and will feature six paved lanes with a 6-mile buffer on both sides. In addition to threatening the homes and livelihoods of hundreds of thousands of people, the superhighway will imperil the region’s wildlife by cutting through several protected areas that help preserve habitat for forest elephants, Cross-River Gorillas, and an internationally recognized biodiversity hotspot (biodiversity hotspots).
“We implore the Cross River State government to reconsider the proposed highway and explore other ways of improving the state’s infrastructure,” said Andrew Dunn, Director for WCS’s Nigeria Country Program. “The project as it stands will displace more than 180 local communities and greatly diminish the country’s natural heritage.”
Several protected areas such as Cross River National Park, Ukpon River Forest Reserve, Cross River South Forest Reserve, Afi River Forest Reserve, and the Afi Mountain Wildlife Sanctuary lie within the swath of expected development. A number of threatened species live in these sites, including forest elephants, Nigeria-Cameroon chimpanzees, drills, Preuss’s red colobus monkeys, pangolins, slender-snouted crocodiles, African gray parrots, and many others.
The highway will also degrade habitat vital to the continued survival of the world’s rarest great ape, the Cross River gorilla, which numbers fewer than 300 animals across its entire range. A proposal to list the entire border region as a UNESCO World Heritage Site and a Transboundary Biosphere Reserve is being developed by the Nigerian and Cameroonian governments, with the support of a number of NGOs.
Report: Nigerian Military, Police Raped Underaged Boko Haram Victims
A devastating Human Rights Watch report published Monday accuses members of the Nigerian military of raping underaged Boko Haram victims.
Nigerian President Muhammadu Buhari has said, through a presidential statement, that he is “worried and shocked” by the allegations and will launch an investigation into the matter, according to Reuters.
Human Rights Watch conducted a study documenting instances of rape, sexual harassment, inducement into sexual activity by promising food, and other such violations against the victims of the Islamic State-affiliated terrorist group. Many of these refugees — technically internally displaced persons (IDPs), as they are refugees in their own country — had already been the victims of rape and non-sexual violent attacks as part of Boko Haram raids, and live in the Maiduguri refugee camp because their villages have been deemed at high risk for subsequent terrorist attacks.
The NGO found 43 women and girls willing to discuss their experience of “sexual abuse, including rape, and exploitation” at the camp. Maiduguri is the capital of northeast Borno State, where Boko Haram is headquartered.
Human Rights Watch’s report notes that the situation in Maiduguri, however, is not unique: a Nigerian polling firm “reported that 66 percent of 400 displaced people in Adamawa, Borno, and Yobe states said that camp officials sexually abuse the displaced women and girls.” One result has been a 40 percent increase in the number of HIV cases in the Maiduguri camp.
The girls and women who told their stories to the NGO accused an assortment of soldiers, police, and militia leaders of this behavior.

Here are more news headlines

 

Dirty linen: the world is told how Nigerian Military, Police raped underaged Boko Haram victims
Despite recession, plans to double aircrafts.
Politics not Igbos’ calling – Bruce
Saudi Arabia’s influence on Nigeria examined
7 Down: economy forces 7Up & CocaCola to reduce bottles
Stay home for life! Ogun sacks union leaders.
Oyegun’s office in total darkness over 1.7m electricity debt
Sorrowful day at Federal Govt Girls College (FGGC), 5 dead, 4 wounded in accident
Global movement rises against Cross River ‘superhighway’
Desist from MMM, it’s fraud – CBN’s official answer to pupil’s question
And hundreds of other headlines

Nigerian airline to double fleet with Middle East routes on the radar
Reuters reports that
Nigeria’s largest airline Arik Air plans to nearly double its fleet to 52 planes within 10 years and has already ordered some of them from Boeing, a source at the company said.
Most of the carrier’s existing fleet are Boeing planes and the source, who did not wish to be identified, said the airline would buy most of the new planes from the US jet maker. The source did not say how many had already been ordered or the value of the purchases.
Privately owned Arik Air needs more planes as it aims to add international routes and increase services, including daily flights to New York, to offset a slowdown at home and bring in more hard currency.
It is also seeking new investors to help it grow and has said it wants to raise up to $1b through a private share placement next year and a possible initial public offering (IPO).
Founded a decade ago and now west Africa’s biggest carrier by passenger numbers, Arik Air has appointed advisers for the share placement and potential IPO in Lagos, with a secondary listing in London.
“We hope to maintain our market leadership and our growth strategy involving substantially increasing our fleet to 52 aircrafts by 2025,” said the managing director Chris Ndulue in Lagos marking the carrier’s 10 years of operations.
“We plan to put our footprint in Europe, Asia and Latin America and the Middle East, and this requires additional aircraft,” he said.
Arik Air’s home market has been hit by falling demand as a currency crisis in Africa’s top economy deepens, due in part to the oil price slump. United and Iberia both stopped services to Nigeria this year and Emirates and Kenya Airways have announced plans to suspend flights to Nigeria’s capital Abuja by next month.
Mr Ndulue said Arik Air would also look at various funding options from international banks despite dollar shortages and the economic recession at home, which had affected businesses.
The carrier currently has a fleet of 28 aircraft, mostly Boeings but also three Airbus planes and nine Bombardier aircraft.
New routes and services would help the airline to generate foreign currency.
Last week Arik announced plans to start daily flights to New York in the next six months, up from three times a week, and start flights to Rome and Paris within 18 to 24 months. The carrier flies mainly within western and central Africa, as well as to London and Johannesburg.
A plunge in Nigeria’s naira currency has increased the cost of importing jet fuel and hurt profit margins as many passengers pay fares in naira.

“Nigeria Can’t Stand Without The South East” – Ben Bruce Says “Igbos Are The Most Successful Nigerians”
Ben Murray Bruce, the senator representing Bayelsa East and the chairman of Silverbird Group, had over the weekend cited the civil war, otherwise known as the Biafran War, as the reason why Nigeria has not grown technologically.
Senator Murray Bruce who was in Aba, stated this on Saturday, August 27, 2016, while addressing the International Youth Day Conference which was organised by the Vision Alive Empowerment under the recognition of the United Nations, UN.
While speaking on the theme, “How To Make A Good Choice While At The Youthful Age,” the senator revealed more about his youthful age stating that the right choice he made during his youth led him to become a successful businessman. He explained why Nigeria is not growing in the tech world, and why technology is not contributing to the Nigeria’s economy.
“Nigeria is moving backward because they think that they are smart, and they do everything possible to erase the Nigeria/Biafra civil war in the history by burning and destroying all the tech tools which Biafrans used during the civil war,” Bruce was quoted as saying. “Igbos are the most successful people in Nigeria today, both tech and business, even before and after the civil war, Igbos has been advanced more than other tribes, that’s why the other tribe in Nigeria can’t do without them.”
Furthermore, the senator said, had Nigeria keep those tech tools and maintain the history of the civil war, with the massive tech tools owned by the Biafrans, Nigeria would have excelled worldwide and make a good fortune out of it. “Look at United State of America today, most of their technology experts are not Americans and most of their tools they use are Chinese owned tools, because during those days Chinese were like slave to them and they see the potentials inside the Chinese and utilized it.
“Likewise, when Nigeria thinks that they have defeated Biafrans during the civil war, that was when General Yakubu Gowon declared ‘no victor no vanquish.’ Had Nigeria kept those Biafran tech tools they used during the civil war and utilized them, you can imagine where Nigeria would have been today in the technology world.
“Nigeria thinks they played a smart deal by burning it and destroying it because they are afraid of Biafra and it has always been their worst nightmare, but they made a big mistake and it has drawn us backward rather than forward in the technology world today. “Nigeria can’t stand without the South East.
Also the Igbos, South East precisely should focus on their God gifted gift and maybe politics isn’t their calling, they have been technologically and Business endowed.
“Igbos are blessed, South East are blessed, only if they can look beyond Nigeria politics and focus on the God gifted talent, they will excel, and be great again.
“Seceding or agitation isn’t the solution only if they can realize their great potentials and focused on it, develop and build South East, look beyond Nigeria politics, since it seems like it’s not their calling,” he added.
Addressing the youths, the senator said, “make a good choice today so that your future will justify you. Stop thinking what a mortal man sitting on the Aso Rock can do for you and start thinking how you can be great to yourself. Furthermore, every human is gifted only if you can find and develop the potentials in you.”

From News Wire Nigeria

How far does Saudi Arabia’s influence go? Look at Nigeria.
In recent months, Iran’s foreign minister blamed “fanaticism from the Dark Ages,” exported by Saudi Arabia, for sparking extremist movements around the world. Defenders, meanwhile, have argued that blaming Saudi Arabia for global terrorism is a mistake. Both of these arguments are wrong, because they either attribute too much or too little influence to Saudi Arabia. So how far does Saudi Arabia’s religious influence extend beyond its borders? Let’s look at northern Nigeria, home to a huge but diverse Salafist movement and the extremist group Boko Haram.
There is no question that Saudi Arabia had significant influence over the development of Salafism in northern Nigeria. One of the key movers in early, proto-Salafist activism in northern Nigeria was Abubakar Gumi, a senior judge and skilled preacher who supervised the creation of the mass-based, Salafist-leaning Izala movement in 1978. Gumi had a lifelong relationship with Saudi Arabia, representing northern Nigeria at meetings of the Saudi-founded Muslim World League in the 1960s, serving on the consultative council of Saudi Arabia’s Islamic University of Medina in the 1970s and receiving the King Faisal Prize in 1987. Gumi and Izala received significant financial support from Saudi Arabia as well, which helped Izala to mount a serious campaign against Sufism, a form of organized Islamic mysticism that was, and remains, widespread in northern Nigeria.
Another, more recent Salafist leader in northern Nigeria was Jafar Mahmud Adam. He began his career as a young preacher in Izala, graduated from the Islamic University of Medina in 1993 and returned to Nigeria to pioneer a more independent and more globally attuned form of Salafism. In the process, he won a mass audience and helped propel a circle of other preachers, many of them also graduates of Adam’s alma mater, into influential positions as preachers and government officials. Adam regularly invoked his learning in Medina as part of the foundation for his religious authority. For much of his later career, he also received financial support from al-Muntada al-Islami Trust, a London-based charity with ties to Saudi Arabia.
Yet neither Gumi nor Adam was a Saudi puppet, and both men adapted their preaching to the context of northern Nigerian society and politics. Intellectually, Gumi remained deeply immersed in the world of North and West African Islamic scholarship, professing admiration for core thinkers in the Maliki school of religious law until the end of his life, even though Salafists largely reject adherence to any such school.
Although Adam was more in tune with global Salafist thought than Gumi was, he and his companions were also pragmatic actors who made compromises with their environment. Despite his reservations about the fairness and viability of democracy, Adam briefly served as an official in the government of Kano state, where he lived. Gumi went even further in his political activism, at one point urging Muslim women to vote by arguing that “politics is more important than prayer” — a position that would horrify many Saudi scholars. Adam was also open to compromises with Sufis, suggesting in one speech that Salafists and Kano’s two major Sufi orders should have equal shares of an annual, public Ramadan service.
If the Salafist movement in Nigeria has relatively strong ties to Saudi Arabia, it may be surprising that Boko Haram has extremely weak organizational ties to the kingdom. Whereas Gumi and Adam had lifelong, public contacts with the kingdom, Boko Haram has been led by figures who were trained almost entirely within Nigeria.
The group has some intellectual ties to the kingdom. Boko Haram’s founder, Muhammad Yusuf, visited Saudi Arabia for pilgrimages and spent a brief period of self-imposed exile there in 2004, but no evidence has shown that he enrolled in an institution or had contact with senior Saudi scholars and officials. Yusuf’s successor, Abubakar Shekau, had even less contact with Saudi Arabia — there is no evidence that Shekau has ever left Africa. Meanwhile, Adam – although he had mentored Yusuf during the early 2000s – publicly repudiated Boko Haram by the mid-2000s, drawing on his credentials from Medina to paint Yusuf as an ignorant opportunist.
There has been some suspicion that al-Muntada al-Islami Trust funneled money to Boko Haram in the early 2000s to help the group prepare for jihad, but the evidence for this is inconclusive. Even if it is true, this would indicate only an indirect tie between Boko Haram and Saudi Arabia itself. At the same time, though, Yusuf claimed religious authority partly on the basis of his interpretations of senior Saudi scholars’ views. It would be false to say that Saudi Arabia supported Boko Haram, but it would be equally false to say that Saudi Arabia had no influence on the movement’s worldview.
The careers of Gumi, Adam and Yusuf all involved multiple factors. It is unlikely that Gumi would have embraced anti-Sufism without his long experience in British colonial schools; he began to question the religious authorities around him by the late 1940s, well before he ever left Nigeria. It is unlikely that Adam could have become so prominent and independent without the broader transformations that occurred in Africa’s politics and media landscape in the 1990s, which allowed young Muslim preachers to build mass audiences by distributing their sermons through technologies such as cassettes and CDs. Yusuf, meanwhile, probably benefited from the early patronage of political elites in Borno, his home state. For all three men, local ties were just as important as transnational ones.
Saudi Arabia’s influence in Africa, then, should neither be exaggerated nor minimized. Support from Saudi Arabia has boosted the careers of certain religious leaders on the continent, increasing their opportunities, funding and stature. But such support has not determined the content of what those leaders say.
There are also profound limits to the influence of Saudi Arabia’s African partners. Despite decades of anti-Sufism from Gumi and others, Sufism continues to remain vibrant and influential for millions of Muslims in northern Nigeria and beyond. Sometimes, Saudi Arabia is neither arsonist nor firefighter, but simply one factor among many in shaping the religious lives of Muslims around the world.
From Washington Post and written by Alexander Thurston, an assistant professor of teaching for the African studies program at Georgetown University. His first book, published in September, is “Salafism in Nigeria: Islam, Preaching, and Politics.”

BusinessDay, reports softdrink companies cut quantity by 17% on back of inflation
Beverage companies in Nigeria have reduced the quantity of soft drinks in their bottles by 16.6 percent amid soaring inflation rate that has continued to raise production costs while impacting their margins negatively. Specifically, Coca Cola Nigeria Limited and 7up Bottling Company have reduced the sizes of their 60cl pet bottle.

From The Punch: CBN warns against patronage of ‘wonder banks’
The Central Bank of Nigeria on Monday warned Nigerians against patronising what it called ‘wonder banks’, stating that their activities were not regulated by it.
The Head, Consumer Protection Department, CBN, Hajiya Kadija Kassim, stated this during a mentoring programme for students of the Government Secondary School, Suleja, Niger State.
The mentoring programme, which was held simultaneously in over 200 schools, was part of activities to mark the World Savings Day.
The apex bank’s warning is coming at a time when the huge unemployment situation in the country is making a lot of people to take interest in an online investment scheme tagged: ‘MMM Federal Republic of Nigeria (nigeria.mmm.net)’.
The platform has embarked on an aggressive online media campaign to lure the investing public to participate in what it called “mutual aid financial network,” with a monthly investment return of 30 per cent.
Kassim, while responding to a question asked by one of the students, described the scheme as fraudulent since it was not supported by any business model.
She said, “We have heard about the activities of MMM, but I want to warn you against it because they are wonder banks that are not regulated.
“Desist from their activities because they are fraudulent.”

Eleven days after Ogun workers embarked on an indefinite strike, government responded today with the dismissal of the state chairman of the Nigeria Labour Congress, NLC, Akeem Ambali, and the state chairman of Nigeria Union of Teachers, NUT, Dare Ilekoya.
Olusola Adeyemi, the Head of Ogun Public Service, announced the sack in Abeokuta in a statement entitled: “Government position on the recommendation of panel of inquiry set up to investigate alleged misconduct of executive members of the NUT on the 2016 World Teachers Day Celebrations held on October 5.”
Also dismissed are 14 other members of the state chapter of the NUT.
In addition, 16 officials of the union were suspended for their roles in organising the celebration.
The NLC chairman, who was until his dismissal the Deputy Director , Community and Social Development, Sagamu Local Government, was alleged to have masterminded the “political campaign rally” during the celebration.
According to Mr. Adeyemi, the panel indicted Mr. Ambali for making “inflammable and scandalous remarks against the state government”, which could cause breach of peace in the state.
“The Ogun State government accepts the recommendation of dismissal of the affected officials which the panel found guilty of contravening the Public Service Rules 04401,04421(c&d) and 04406(a)”, Mr. Adeyemi said.
He therefore directed the relevant agencies of government to implement the government decision.
In a swift reaction, the NLC chairman described the action as “executive recklessness and abuse of all statutory laws” urging workers to remain resolute in the quest to have their legitimate rights from “an autocratic and deceitful” government.
Mr. Ambali in a statement on Monday night, said he had never been summoned by any panel, and that, “the attention of the leadership was just drawn to the purported dismissal through phone calls.
“We are calling on our ever committed workers to remain at home and not be intimidated by this action that is against all norms of democratic and fair hearing.
“I have never been summoned by any panel and this clearly shows how autocratic and deceitful the government of Ibikunle Amosun is.
“Our cause for this strike is legitimate, just and right. They have only shown their true colours and this new approach is unprecedented in the history of this country, as no state governor has done what they are doing to us in Ogun state.
“Their past draconian efforts have never yielded any fruits, so also will be this move to cage us in Ogun State.
“We only want to warn that they should not set this state on fire, even as we urge our members to remain calm and just stay at home. The struggle continues,” he said.
Workers in the state commenced an indefinite strike on October 20 to protest non- remittance of 12 months deductions from their salaries.

From The Premium Times, Nigeria Supreme Court Judges Accused of Corruption Step Down
The spokesperson of Nigeria’s Supreme Court, Ahuraka Isah, on Monday confirmed reports that two Supreme Court judges accused of corruption have stopped sitting.
The two judges, Iyang Okoro and Sylvester Nguta, were among seven judges arrested by operatives of the State Security Service, following allegations of corruption.
In a telephone chat with PREMIUM TIMES, Mr. Isah, who speaks for the Chief Justice of Nigeria, Mahmud Mohammed, said the Supreme Court judges suspended sittings since the raid on their homes and their subsequent arrest.
“None of the judges whose houses were raided and arrested by the SSS have been suspended by the NJC,” the spokesperson said. “But the two affected Supreme Court justices voluntarily recused themselves from all judicial functions since the raid occurred.”
Seven judges were on October 7 arrested by the SSS following allegations of corruption.
While the affected judges have denied any wrongdoing, claiming victimisation for previous stands they took against public officials, the SSS said their arrest followed credible information about the judges’ alleged involvement in bribery and corruption allegations.
The SSS also accused the National Judicial Council of not judiciously treating petitions against corrupt judges. The NJC denied the allegation by the SSS.
Various groups have given divergent opinions about the raids and arrest of the judges. While some have commended the arrests, others have accused the executive of interfering with the judiciary by the arrests.
However, the President of the Nigeria Bar Association, Abubakar Mahmoud, had advised that the accused judges be suspended pending when they are cleared or convicted.
The NJC rejected Mr. Mahmoud’s advice.

Truck crushes 4 Oyo FGGC students, driver
FOUR students of the Federal Government Girls’ College, Oyo, who were returning from a mid-term break died in an auto crash, yesterday evening, when a gari-laden articulated truck fell on a bus conveying them to school.
The incident, in which the bus driver also died, left five other girls with severe injuries.
An impeccable source, who is a senior staff in the school, told Vanguard that the accident occurred at Sabo Market and that the four students died on the spot.
Students and teachers broke down in tears when the names of the affected students were mentioned on the assembly ground, yesterday.
The names of those who died in the accident are Ibirogba Marian, JSS 3; Ladipo Mojisola, SS1; Giwa Tohibat and John Bukola, who were both in SS3.
Vanguard further gathered that some of the students were coming from Oyo, while others were on their way from Lagos.
At press time, it was gathered that the father of one of the deceased came to the school Monday night to collect the remains of his daughter. The others were said to have been taken to a nearby town, Aawe for burial yesterday.
The incident generated tension, when students and some sympathisers wanted to stage peaceful protest. It was shelved for security reasons.
Confirming the accident, the state Police Public Relations Officer, Superintendent Adekunle Ajisebutu, said: “A DAF truck, loaded with gari, fell on a Suzuki commercial mini bus conveying students of the Federal Government College, Oyo.
“As a result, four of the students and the driver died, while five others were injured and were taken to Peamark Hospital, Oyo. They are responding to treatment. Investigation has since commenced.”

The Punch Reports police brutality
Police loot community, torture farmer to death
A 42-year-old farmer, Segun Elegbede, has died in the custody of policemen from the Magbon Police Division, Ogun State.
PUNCH Metro learnt that Segun was tortured before being abducted by a team of policemen from the Anti-Robbery Squad of the state, who invaded Ajibawo village, in the Ado-Odo/Ota Local Government Area.
The policemen were alleged to have looted shops in the community after which they descended on the victim.
He was said to have been taken away to the division and prevented from seeing friends and family members.
Seven days after he was arrested, a member of his family was reportedly called on the telephone that he was dead and his corpse deposited in a morgue.

Total blackout at APC National Secretariat over 1.7 million Naira
The national secretariat of the All Progressives Congress, APC, has been thrown into darkness following its inability to offset the 1.7 million Naira debt owed Abuja Electricity Distribution Company, AEDC.
The AEDC has disconnected the party’s office from electricity.
It was also gathered that the onset of the current economic meltdown, party activities had almost come to halt due to poor funds, as the party had in recent times, relied on the sale of forms to contestants in the last Edo State governorship election and the forthcoming election in Ondo State.
Vanguard reports that the APC national secretariat may have generated over N100 million this year from the sale of Nomination and Expression of Interest forms for Edo and Ondo States governorship primaries.
The ugly development has forced some staff of the secretariat to contribute some money to power the electricity generator at the premises.

The next article is from Science Daily and is titled:
Nigeria’s superhighway threatens local communities, elephants, and gorillas
A proposed superhighway in Nigeria’s Cross River State will displace 180 indigenous communities and threaten one of the world’s great centers of biodiversity if completed, according to experts.
A proposed superhighway in Nigeria’s Cross River State will displace 180 indigenous communities and threaten one of the world’s great centers of biodiversity if completed, according to WCS (Wildlife Conservation Society).
In response, WCS is launching an international campaign to encourage decision makers in Nigeria to pursue alternative development options to either reroute the proposed highway away from the protected areas and community forests along the border area with Cameroon, or to rehabilitate existing highways. The campaign has generated 41,786 petitions since October 14.
The process of clearing a corridor for the project has already begun but has been temporarily halted as a result of protests from local communities, which helped to initiate an environmental impact assessment, but work on the highway could restart at any time.
The WCS campaign is teaming up with the Ekuri Initiative, an award-winning forest stewardship organization run by one of the many indigenous communities in the path of the proposed highway. The Ekuri Initiative has already delivered 253,000 signatures to the federal government asking for Nigerian President Buhari to protect their precious ancestral forests, and WCS is asking its followers to sign on with their support.
“The proposed highway poses an enormous threat to the cultures and the wildlife of the entire region,” said John Calvelli, WCS’s Executive Vice President for Public Affairs and Director for the 96 Elephants campaign and other public engagement efforts for conservation. “We’re happy to lend our support to the Ekuri Initiative in the effort to save the local communities of Cross River State and the irreplaceable natural treasures also found there.”
The new highway will stretch 162 miles in length and will feature six paved lanes with a 6-mile buffer on both sides. In addition to threatening the homes and livelihoods of hundreds of thousands of people, the superhighway will imperil the region’s wildlife by cutting through several protected areas that help preserve habitat for forest elephants, Cross-River Gorillas, and an internationally recognized biodiversity hotspot (biodiversity hotspots).
“We implore the Cross River State government to reconsider the proposed highway and explore other ways of improving the state’s infrastructure,” said Andrew Dunn, Director for WCS’s Nigeria Country Program. “The project as it stands will displace more than 180 local communities and greatly diminish the country’s natural heritage.”
Several protected areas such as Cross River National Park, Ukpon River Forest Reserve, Cross River South Forest Reserve, Afi River Forest Reserve, and the Afi Mountain Wildlife Sanctuary lie within the swath of expected development. A number of threatened species live in these sites, including forest elephants, Nigeria-Cameroon chimpanzees, drills, Preuss’s red colobus monkeys, pangolins, slender-snouted crocodiles, African gray parrots, and many others.
The highway will also degrade habitat vital to the continued survival of the world’s rarest great ape, the Cross River gorilla, which numbers fewer than 300 animals across its entire range. A proposal to list the entire border region as a UNESCO World Heritage Site and a Transboundary Biosphere Reserve is being developed by the Nigerian and Cameroonian governments, with the support of a number of NGOs.

Report: Nigerian Military, Police Raped Underaged Boko Haram Victims

A devastating Human Rights Watch report published Monday accuses members of the Nigerian military of raping underaged Boko Haram victims.
Nigerian President Muhammadu Buhari has said, through a presidential statement, that he is “worried and shocked” by the allegations and will launch an investigation into the matter, according to Reuters.
Human Rights Watch conducted a study documenting instances of rape, sexual harassment, inducement into sexual activity by promising food, and other such violations against the victims of the Islamic State-affiliated terrorist group. Many of these refugees — technically internally displaced persons (IDPs), as they are refugees in their own country — had already been the victims of rape and non-sexual violent attacks as part of Boko Haram raids, and live in the Maiduguri refugee camp because their villages have been deemed at high risk for subsequent terrorist attacks.
The NGO found 43 women and girls willing to discuss their experience of “sexual abuse, including rape, and exploitation” at the camp. Maiduguri is the capital of northeast Borno State, where Boko Haram is headquartered.
Human Rights Watch’s report notes that the situation in Maiduguri, however, is not unique: a Nigerian polling firm “reported that 66 percent of 400 displaced people in Adamawa, Borno, and Yobe states said that camp officials sexually abuse the displaced women and girls.” One result has been a 40 percent increase in the number of HIV cases in the Maiduguri camp.
The girls and women who told their stories to the NGO accused an assortment of soldiers, police, and militia leaders of this behavior.

Here are news headlines from various newspapers

CJN replies SERAP, blames FG, Govs for judges’ corruption
Opec oil output hits new record on Nigeria, Libya
Gowon, Ekweremadu advocate development of Sports to enhance Nigeria’s unity
Ondo election: Deal with your problems, Lalong tells Mimiko
NNPC Seeks $51b Investment in Gas Sector
Archbishop Of Nigeria Battles For ‘Faithful Church’ Against Pressure To Compromise On Gays
Just like farmers; Fulani herdsmen have the right to live – APC governors
APC Governors write Buhari over ambassadorial nominees
Abati ‘offers to refund 5 million Naira to EFCC’
Ex-head of Nigerian stockbrokers, indicted for fraud, loses in court
Csos To Meet Over Anti Corruption Bills
Fani-Kayode Still Illegally Detained, EFCC Lied About Deatails Of Kukah’s Visit – Aide
Ondo 2016: Akeredolu meets Buhari, says he has Tinubu’s support
Buhari Apologizes to FCT Indigenes over exclusion from Appointments
Police loot community, torture farmer to death
Lalong will not be re-elected in 2019 – Jang
240 Boko Haram terrorists surrender — Nigerian Military
OPEC oil output hits new record on Nigeria, Libya – Reuters survey
Buhari is insincere about Niger Delta problems – Ijaw group
OPEC Agrees On Output Cut To Boost Oil Prices
Govt Renames Petroleum Bill – Draft Expected Soon
Factional PDP takes over party secretariat in Kwara
Hairdresser Arrested for Cocaine trafficking
Nigerian airline to double fleet with Middle East routes on the radar
Buhari hails Nigerian doctor, Olutoye over surgery on un-born baby
Obaseki’s inauguration: Oshiomhole appoints Edo SSG as transition committee chairman
Alleged Corruption: Justices Okoro, Ademola, Ngwuta risk 58 yrs in jail
Total blackout at APC National Secretariat over 1.7 million Naira debt
Kano Assembly okays life jail for kidnappers, 15 years for rapists
Angry son butchers father, throws his body inside toilet
Ojukwu handed over to Uwazuruike as his successor before he died – MASSOB
Pandemonium as Police, Okada riders Clash in Lagos
Nigeria’s Vice President Tells Christian Faithful: God Will Bless Our Nation
PDP warns Buhari to beware of Fashola
Why EFCC Re-arraigned Orji Uzor Kalu for 2.7 billion Naira Fraud
AMBASSADORIAL NOMINEES: APC Governors present Protest letters to Buhari
Gionee invests $10m in Nigeria
Serving Army Officer Arrested for Robbery
$390,000 Japanese Surgeon’s Cash tears Olympic team, as Players grumble over Sharing formula
Police Sergeant Arrested for Escorting Armed Robbers
Reverend Matthew Kukah Visits Fani Kayode, Abati, Obanikoro in EFCC Cells
200 bilion Naira insurance probe: NAICOM to report indicted operators to EFCC
Shocked Buhari Orders Probe of Sexual Abuse in IDP camps
Truck crushes 4 Oyo FGGC students, driver
Nigeria draw Egypt, Ghana, Cote d’Ivoire in AFCON Beach Soccer
Maternal Mortality: How Lack Of Family Planning Kills Women
Ondo Guber: I’ll Defeat A Combination Of Ibrahim, Jegede, Akeredolu Boasts
FG, Labour In Fresh Talks Over 56,000 Naira Minimum Wage
Governors Mohammed, Badaru Meet PMB, Raise The Alarm Over Kidnappings
Ranching, Only Solution To Farmers- Herdsmen Clashes – Ortom
‘Nigeria To Have 6 Obstetric Fistula Hospitals By 2017’
NNPC Seeks $51b New Investments In Gas Sector
NSE: Investors lose 3 billion Naira as Bankole seeks multinationals’ listing
Substituting Jegede’s name is an injustice – PDP Elders’ Forum
Buhari orders probe into alleged sexual abuse in IDPs camps
Government renames PIB as PRB, submits draft bill to National Assembly soon
Boko Haram kills five soldiers, four others in ambus
How government agencies frustrate food export at nation’s airports
Kukah visits EFCC cell, prays for Abati, Obanikoro, Fani-Kayode
One in seven kids suffers acute air pollution, says UNICEF
Residents flee Delta community over herdsmen’s attacks
Judges’ arrest, revenge, not anti-corruption fight – Abuja protesters
Government to commercialise gas flaring by Q1 2017
NHRC plans to probe arrest of judges
Senate panel tasks FG on economic recession
Arewa leaders pledge to curb insecurity in North Nigerian
Woman batters niece over grandmother’s welfare
Presidency resolves feud between Senate, PSC over police recruitment
‘40 million vulnerable to poverty, insecurity over receding Lake Chad’
How past leaders distorted Abuja master plan
AEDC disconnects APC secretariat over alleged 1.7 million Naira debt
Ogun sacks NLC chair, 15 others; suspends 19 NUT officials
Cross River submits final EIA report on 260km highway
‘Lagos will continue to protect foreign investors’
EFCC re-arraigns Orji Kalu in Lagos
Nigerian education academy begins yearly congress today
‘Anybody who expects corruption-free Judiciary would be living in dream land’
Government apologises to FCT indigenes over exclusion in appointments
Protest greets police postings
Lagos legislators back Buhari on $29.96b loan
APC members in Kwara divided over caretaker committees
Group faults Senate on CCT, CCB
Lagos trains 700 residents to reduce disasters
Lasg Seeks Support To Boost Education
‘Nigerians should save during recession’
From gene editing to death traps, Seattle scientists innovate in race to end malaria
Government targets 300,000 jobs from mining sector
NSITF pays 700 million Naira to injured workers
Couple, siblings burnt to death in Osun auto crash
FG appoints Okhiria, MD of Nigeria Railway Corporation
DSS’ Daily Invitation Stops Arrested Judges from Sitting
Buhari Orders Probe of Sexual Abuse at IDP Camps
Ondo Guber Crisis Keeps PDP Reconciliation at Bay
Scanner failure threatens bilateral trade at Seme border
FBNQuest report puts Nigeria’s Q3 growth at -1.7%
Senate Investigates Volkswagen for Alleged Sabotage
240 Boko Haram Terrorists Surrender to MNJTF
Police Recruitment: FG, Senate Adopt Community Policing, to Recruit Nine Officers Per LG
PDP Berates Fashola, Says Lagos Better under Ambode
CJN advocates modern judiciary with tech knowledge
Why amendment of CCB, CCT Act by NASS’ll fail —Sagay, Mamman
Falana at Vanguard editor’s reception, says accused judges must be arraigned
Chevron partners Niger to improve rice production
Bankers’ institute rallies support for ailing economy
Rivers State government urges outdoor advertisers to obtain licence
Kerosene explosion kills two in Akwa Ibom
Nigeria’s superhighway threatens local communities, elephants, and gorillas
Oil Prices Fall to One-Month Low as Concerns Mount over OPEC Deal
Kukah Felicitates with Obanikoro, Fani-Kayode, Abati at EFCC
Kachikwu: New Gas Terms for PSCs out by Year End
Lopsided appointments: APC Governors write Buhari
Tension in Abuja as lawyers protest, call for release of Dasuki, Kanu, others
Institute urges Imo state to adopt planning laws
Lawyer sues Lagos over council appointments
FG Deploys over 1,000 Midwives to PHC Facilities Nationwide
NDIC begins secret staff recruitment
PDP Asks FG Save Ondo from Imminent Crisis
Nimasa, NRC Paid 288 million Naira Premium On ‘dead’ Lift, Generators – Reps
Imo raises panel on salaries
NLC blames recession on private sector greed
Nnpc Targets Gas In 126 Northern Basins, Others, eyes $3b Investment In Rail Transport
Power firms want forex at official rate
Cbn Warns Against Patronage Of ‘wonder Banks’
Skye Bank sacks 50 more workers
MDAs Take Over Assets Sales From BPE
Naira remains at 470 as dollar shortage continues
Recession: Fg Eyes Real Sector, Msmes For Recovery
BlackBerry making Android phones to bridge connectivity gap – Asinugo
Abuja Disco Disconnects APC National Secretariat
Kalu: Igbos are Their Own Worst Enemies
FG Sets up Task Force to Rebuild Destroyed Health Facilities in North East
Ex-Osun Ssg Laments Rising Number Of Hungry Nigerians
NLC, ERA caution Lagos against privatisation of water
Simba Group empowers women tricycle drivers
Group lauds anti-graft fight, seeks youth empowerment schemes
Arik Air Airlifts 19.5 million Passengers in 10 Years
FGGC Oyo Loses Four Students to Road Carnage
House Commitee Mandates Customs Boss to Appear or Risk Arrest
Amosun Dismisses Labour Leaders
Lagos Lawyer Sues FG Challenging Public Holidays
Poor State of Nigerian Roads Worries NUJ
ACF Expresses Worry over Increasing Insecurity in the North
FG creates new regulator for petroleum industry
Political Treachery Robbed Us of Victory, Says Faleke
BBOG Urges FG to Speed up Release of Remaining Chibok Girls
World Bank to Fund Nigeria-Niger Link Road
Southern Kaduna Killings: El-Rufai Issues Ultimatum to Police, Traditional Rulers
Soldiers Kill Two Suspected Militants in Niger Delta
OPEC members jittery as supply surges to 33.82 million bpd
Kano launches 1 billion Naira agric credit
Report: Nigerian Military, Police Raped Underaged Boko Haram Victims
Receding Lake Chad Leaves 40 million Youths Unemployed
Ortom: Why Benue State Can’t Hold LG Elections Now
No Peace Talks between FG, Niger Delta Leaders Can Succeed without Tompolo, Says Activist
NBA Constitutes Taskforces to Help Ameliorate North-east, Niger Delta’s Crises
Why FG is careful to privatise refineries – Kachikwu
PDP Chieftain Asks Appeal Court President to Constitute Election Petition Tribunal for Imo
Bayelsa marks thanksgiving day tomorrow
‘Why FG’ll spend $550m on two back-up satellites’
Buhari directs governors, IGP to probe sexual abuse in IDP camps
Outrage Greets Alleged Sexual Abuse Of Idps By Soldiers, Others
Recs, Officials Under Bribery Probe Won’t Supervise Elections – INEC
Three years validity for UTME
FG to hike gas flare penalties, end flaring by 2020
I’ll beat Jegede, Eyitayo combined, Akeredolu boasts
Senate lifts suspension on police recruitment
Three docked in Ekiti for alleged damage of Yinka Ayefele’s vehicle
Bribery Allegation: Group drags Buhari to court, insists Ameachi, Onu must resign
Buhari is changing leadership perception in Nigeria, Africa – Osinbajo
Leadership failure destroyed Nigeria’s economy – Gbajabiamila
Faleke berates APC national leaders
APC takes responsibility for economic challenges
Railway concession’ll pull $3b investment to Nigeria — Amaechi
Lawyers protest continued detention of Dasuki, Kanu, others
Workers’ strike: Ogun sacks NLC, NUT chairmen, 14 others
Jegede, Jimoh Ibrahim can contest as running mates – Akeredolu mocks PDP
Reps propose ‘Center for the Aged’ in 774 council areas
Southern Kaduna attacks: El-Rufai meets traditional rulers, security operatives
NSA says plan to de-radicalise militants not in cold storage
Africa retains only 1% of 1 trillion dollars annual maritime trade – AU
Lawyers in solidarity protest for arrested judges
Boko Haram: HIV ravages IDP camp
Boko Haram kills 5 soldiers, 4 others in ambush
Skye Bank Sacks 50 Employees, Outsourced Staffs
SON boss revs up fight against substandard goods
APC governors brief Buhari on insecurity
Ondo guber: Buhari hosts Akeredolu, gives blessing
CBN: Financial Literacy Now Compulsory in Basic Education
Leave Buhari out of judges’ arrest saga — Presidency
Libya, Nigeria Boost OPEC Output To Record Levels
Police, Senate bicker over recruitment
External Reserves Falls to $23.948 Billion
Abia police arrest sergeant, others for robbery
“I don’t have any rift with Asiwaju Bola Tinubu, says Rotimi Akeredolu
Troops destroy militants’ shrine, nab chief priest
Niger Delta: Ijaw group doubts FG’s sincerity
NNPC de-recognises IPMAN over leadership tussle
CBN to sell 123 billion Naira T-bills
Index sheds 0.72% on sell offs
Lagos PDP commends Ambode over abandoned projects
Niger Delta peace talk: Ndokwa, Isoko threaten court action
Buhari-Niger Delta leaders meeting: A good beginning
Lagos engages 500 emergency response volunteers
Experts worry over rising cases of drug abuse
Jonathan was never committed to defeating Boko Haram – Osinbajo
LASG urged to commit 10% oil derivation to health insurance
Younger pregnant women have higher stroke risk than older women – Study
Kachikwu: FG May Sell Three Refineries After Rehabilitation
Akwa Ibom youths give Mobil ultimatum to implement agreement
Delta communities give NPDC 7 days to meet demands
Bayelsa communities clash over oil-rich land
Siblings die in kerosene explosion
PSC: 10,000 police recruits for community policing
Wanted: New strategy to tackle waste in Lagos
Three held for disrupting Ooni’s visit to Ekiti
Federal Govt to attract over $3b investment through rail transport
Ambode Is Doing Well – PDP
Govt begins process to auction 5.4GHz spectrum
If Fashola were Igbo, he would have left Tinubu – Kalu
We have over 50 gang members – Lagos teenage thief
Nigerian Shi’ites Say They Face Repression
Nigeria to probe alleged rapes by army, police
Two beheaded in Rivers
Inec Urges Parties In Rivers To Withdraw Cases
Officers’ morale’ll be boosted while wearing made-in-Aba shoes – Nigerians speak
Clashes: Police warn farmers, herdsmen in Gombe
No political prisoners nor political exiles under my Administration – Goodluck Jonathan
House yet to pass CCT Amendment Bill – Gbajabiamila
Shehu of Borno’s son weds Emir of Daura’s daughter
Nigeria: House Condemns Slow Pace of Work At MMIAs New Terminal

 

Are you a businessperson or entrepreneur? You can market your business on Breaking. Visit the new business board on breaking.com.ng/buyandsell and you can begin promoting your business.

Stay with Breaking.com.ng and you will get fresh news first. One page, 100 headlines, and a news monitor that shows you key events and happenings in Nigeria at a glance. Go to breaking.com.ng and you will know more than your colleagues in a jiffy. We will be coming by again with more headlines and news mashes, in the meantime, happy news reading.

Breaking’s V I V I D L Y

The Impeccable Crook!

Impeccable Crooks

A cartoon From VANGUARD Newspaper

You can hear the headlines on Breaking Radio

Listen to news, download Inside the News, and share the news at Breaking Radio.
Spread this ...