Why Nigeria must bridge infrastructural gaps to aid food production

As Nigeria makes efforts to ensure that agriculture plays a key role in its quest for revenue diversification, stakeholders in the sector have charged the Federal Government to bridge infrastructural gaps to aid agribusiness development in the country and ensure food security. Indubitably, some of the greatest problems confronting rural farmers and communities in Nigeria…

World Food Day: Abiru rates FG, LASG high on food security

The candidate of All Progressives Congress (APC) for senatorial by-election in Lagos East, Tokunbo Abiru Friday commended the Anchor Borrowers’ Programme (ABP), an initiative of the Federal Government aimed at achieving food security in the country. Abiru, the immediate past Group Managing Director/Chief Executive Officer of Polaris Bank Limited, also endorsed the Lagos State Government…

‘Food security may remain elusive’

By Ladesope Ladelokun Coupled with the threat posed by floods, the Acting Director-General of National Biotechnology Development Agency (NABDA), Prof Alex Akpa, has raised the alarm that Nigeria cannot attain food security with the way agriculture is practised in the country. Akpa expressed worry that most of the innovations currently being adopted by nations that…

COVID-19 effects threaten food security, increase vulnerability of women farmers

Mrs Motunrayo Ajagbe, 55, is a smallholder farmer in Ibadan. She has afarm at Oluyole Local Government Area. She and members of her familydepend on the sale of the farm produce for survival. During the initial five weeks of the lockdown occasioned by COVID 19pandemic, she lost 70 per cent of her crops and vegetables because shecould not go to the farm to tend to them. She observed that more than 70 per cent of the crops and vegetableswere lost due to lack of movement to take care of the farm. She said: “We were caught unaware, so not going to farm had aserious impact on the family; and although I work with a privateschool, schools were also closed and no income came in for me. Webecame somewhat vulnerable. “It affected my children because we only eat one meal a day and eatanything we find in between meals like a refreshment. “Already, we have incurred more than 70 per cent revenue loss due toCOVID-19 pandemic and the lockdown has hindered movement and wecouldn’t sell the little harvest we got. The situation becomesfrightening. READ ALSO: COVID-19: Olam moves to address global food security challenges “Not only this, we are unable to move freely to go to where our farmis located because the farm is far from where we live — about atwo-hour walk. “Due to this, many of our plants were destroyed, many of the cropsdried off even as climate change affected farming this year becausethe rain didn’t fall as expected. “Besides this, we have our own method which is irrigation but wereunable to apply water to the crops to make them grow because there wasno movement. “We were unable to prepare the vegetables in the nursery bed andthen transfer them to the field as well as do other necessary thingsto keep the plant healthy and ensure growth. This has caused damage tothe crops’’. This is just the experience of one out of numerous women farmersacross the country whose farming activities have been sustaining foodsecurity even at subsistence level. Unarguably, before the outbreak of COVID-19 in late 2019, rising foodprices, inadequate investment in subsistence farming, climate changeand lack of capacity, especially for women to acquire land forfarming, among other social factors, posed serious threat to farming. Investigations reveal that farmers, especially women, have on manyoccasions, expressed concern about the impacts of COVID-19 on farmingactivities, observing that the situation can result in a food crisisand increased vulnerability if the authorities don’t do the needful. For instance, smallholder women farmers in some parts of Oyo Stateexpress fear over food shortage due to the effect of lockdownoccasioned by COVID-19, climate change and inability to get governmentpalliatives, among other factors. The women, on the platform of the Small Scale Women FarmersOrganisation in Nigeria (SWOFON) in some local government areas of OyoState, spoke in separate interviews with the News Agency of Nigeria(NAN). According to them the initial lockdown for five weeks in the countryand particularly restriction of movement to Lagos and Ogun State havecost them to lose revenue between ranging 50 per cent and 70 per cent. They note that inter-state travel ban has had adverse effects on theirbusiness which is their means of livelihood. SWOFON is a coalition of Women Farmers Associations and Groups acrossNigeria that, over the years, has championed advocacy and garnersupport for more than 500,000 grassroots women farmers in Nigeria. The association has continued to witness myriad of challenges in itsquest to provide for their households and ensure food security for thenation. In many rural areas of Oyo State visited by a NAN correspondent, theharrowing experience of smallholder women farmers continue to echo asthe challenges bedeviling these women remain unabated even with theoutbreak of COVID-19 pandemic. The common denominator for all smallholder women farmers in the stateremains lack of funds and inability to access grants and loans fromthe government as well as lack of modern farming implements, access tochemicals to control pests and insects and fertiliser. While this group falls into the most vulnerable in the society, theircontributions to food production and security in Nigeria cannot beoveremphasised in spite of the challenges. With the diversification programme of the Nigerian economy to non-oilsector and in agriculture notwithstanding, smallholder women farmersare clinging to the hope of receiving deserved attention from thegovernment. Women farmers recall that the Federal Ministry of Agriculture andRural Development had its first draft of gender policy in agriculturein 2014 to fill the gaps of gender integration and responsivenessidentified in the Agricultural Transformation Agenda. The document was revised in August 2016 to reflect the vision of thepresent administration entitled: “Agriculture Promotion Policy andStrategy, the Green Alternative’’. But smallholder women farmers say they have yet to benefit from theinitiative set up to underscore the vital role of agriculture inachieving Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) one, two and five. The goals are set to eradicate poverty, end hunger and achieve foodsecurity, as well as improved nutrition anchored on achievingsustainable agriculture, gender equality and empowerment of women andgirls. Women farmers note that the goals may not be achieved because ofpoverty and lack of mechanised resources that have made them to remainat the lower rung of the ladder in society. A visit to their farms shows a level of struggle and neglect as thesewomen, who are mostly the breadwinners in their families, havecontinued to farm to keep up their families and feed the nation intheir own way. The women, however, alleged that they have continued to use manual andarchaic farming methods and practices while being at the mercy ofloans and climate change for survival. In Lagelu Local Government Area of Oyo State, Mrs Jolaoye Mujidat, 45,a smallholder woman farmer at Iyana Offa, says the impact of thelockdown occasioned by COVID-19 is enormous, affecting the welfare ofher family. “Exporting of farm produce has been halted due to an inter-statetravel ban. Income has greatly reduced. We only sell to people aroundand that has reduced the cost of the produce by half and we sell belowmarket prices. “In the planting season due to the downturn in our income we areunable to expand our farm; although there is enough land to farm on,no money to farm on the existing land. “We do the labour work instead of contracting it out due to paucityof funds. I am unable to do farming work as I want to due to lack offunds. I need the money to buy inputs and pay for labour on the farm. “Everything is now very expensive, we get our maize seedlings fromthe north and some other crops. To plant maize is very difficult nowbecause of the lack of seedlings. “Cassava stems are so costly now, we can’t even get around thisplace if we want to. What we do is that we cut cassava stems from theones we have planted before, that’s how we have been managing. “Before the lockdown, maize produce was taken to Lagos and otherstates and people from other states came to buy from us as well butthat had changed. “Due to low income, we are unable to buy the needed chemicals toprevent our crops from being destroyed by insects. “We have been trained on how to apply the chemicals to stop insectsfrom destroying our farms only that we have no means to do this, so weare soliciting help on this. “We want them to provide us with pesticides and power tillers suchthat they will be of great assistance to us in farming. It will evenaid the expansion of our business’’, she said. In Ibarapa Central Local Government Area, Igboora, Oyo State, MrsFunmilayo Olaniran, 50, a smallholder farmer notes that farming oughtto be very lucrative venture and women can be supported to boost foodproduction. “Six of us came together to farm as members of SWOFON due to old ageand lack of support to expand this farming business. “We plant maize, cassava and melon on five hectares of land but theeffect of COVID-19 has had a negative impact on our business. “The lockdown occasioned by the virus prevented inter-state travel,meaning our produce could not be transported to where it would besold….

LASPOTECH begins large scale fish farming

The Lagos State Polytechnic (LASPOTECH), Ikorodu, says it has officially commenced a cage culture pilot project for large scale fish farming at Agbowa-Ikosi  beach in  Epe, to support the state  government’s food security project. LASPOTECH acting rector, Mr Olumide Metilelu, said in a statement signed by Mr Olanrewaju Kuye, LASPOTECH’s Director of  Information and Public Relations,  Tuesday in Lagos. Metilelu said that the…

Food security: 3,500 farmers benefit from Obaseki’s Independent Farmers Initiative

Not less than 3,500 farmers in Edo State have benefited from Governor Godwin Obaseki’s Independent Farmers Initiative (IFI) designed to boost food security in the state’s post-coronavirus (COVID-19) economy. Addressing the farmers at the flag-off of the initiative in Umegbe Community, Oredo Local Government Area, Commissioner for Agriculture and Natural Resources, Hon. Richard Uyi Edebiri,…